FICCS (Foundation for International Cardiac & Children's Services)
1010 Sheridan Rd |Wilmette, IL 60091 |224-875-1631
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Insecurity
Lack of security keeps women from moving easily in the slums. Police are absent and justice is seldom rendered. Women suffer in silence in Africa. These women labor daily just for water

Lack of Education
Personal Health
Challenges Facing Women and Children in Africa
​Women and girls suffer from bias and oppression which leads to lack of opportunities and even depression. Their living conditions are horrific, yet they are resilient and overcome despite these obstacles.

Girls routinely leave school and are subject to deviant lifestyles simply to feed their families. But thanks to FICCS we have been able to help hundreds of girls overcome these obstacles.
Boys are given priority over girls who are burdened with all the household chores and taking care of siblings. This girl tends the cattle, milks them and cares for the family instead of school.

Women's healthcare is the lowest priority in the household. She suffers from easily preventable diseases especially those related to women including menstrual problems.
Domestic/Sexual Abuse
Girls are preyed upon because they have no voice and the system is not designed to help the victims. Girls are married off as early as 13. Girls are abused physically, sexually and emotionally leading to depression.

Clean Water/Sanitation
Malnutrition
Toilets are mere holes in the ground and there is no running water. Girls are constantly fetching water for cooking, bathing and eating. Rivers of raw sewage flow down alleys while trash is piled 10 feet high in areas.

Women and girls are always served last so if there is nothing left, they do not eat. Slum dwellers usually eat one meal a day, two if they are lucky. Rising food costs have only made the problem worse.

"Walking is too dangerous and many girls are sent out by their parents to beg for food which leads to the abuse of children."
Ayub Shimaka, School Director